Oral Sensory integration

By Debra Hartley on August 14, 2013 in with No Comments

Oral Sensory integration

Senses include touch, smell, taste, vision, and hearing. If your child has oral hypersensitivity or hyposensitivity, he/she may have either a highly aroused nervous system (which may not recognize common sensations as non-threatening), or under aroused nervous system (which may need increased input as a prerequisite to initiate chewing and/or speaking). Since sensory is a prerequisite to movement, it is important to look at your child’s sensory system to address oral difficulties, and/or refer to an occupational therapist for the treatment options available for sensory disorders.

Signs that your child may have either a hyper- or hypo- oral sensory environment:

  • resists trying new foods
  • has a limited range of “safe” foods to eat
  • has a hyper-active gag reflex
  • hates brushing teeth
  • Overstuffs his/her mouth with food
  • Teeth Grinding
  • Chews on fingers
  • dislikes it when somebody tries to wipe his/her nose
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